Service Learning Planning

Service Learning Planning 2016 (word)    

Service Learning Planning 2016 (pdf)

A good teacher is prepared and available to his or her students at all times. You are responsible for all aspects of planning and implementing art experiences for your students. This charge covers a range of responsibilities: securing supplies, learning about new studio methods and materials, talking about artists, asking questions and challenging your students to develop creative ideas. Specifically, you are expected to:

  • Develop a plan for each meeting/lesson. Plans need to be completed and turned in one week before you teach. Planning materials can be reviewed and download from the Lesson Plan Format page. You will also find additional planning materials on this page.
  • Maintain a positive attitude while working with your students. Establishing and developing a rapport with your students is essential for a successful img_3363experience. Consider ways to share information about yourself: share personal stories, bring and talk about your art work; and ask questions about their background and interests.
  • Prepare all materials. Be set-up for your meeting/lesson at least an hour before the starting time. Participants often come early. (You can set up the night or morning before if you have classes scheduled up to the time you have to teach.) You are responsible for knowing where all materials are in the art education studio and storage areas. To familiarize yourself with the studio, view the first five videos in the series on the Art Education Facilities and Resources page. This should be completed before your first meeting. Please sign out all materials.
  • Familiarize yourself with studio materials, techniques, and processes. It is especially important that you experiment with each before you introduce them to your students. You do not have to be a “master” of the material or process, but you should have enough knowledge to avoid safety issues or frustration. Resource materials are available in the seminar room. Periodicals such as School Arts, Arts and Activities, and Scholastic Art can provide useful information. Information about artists and posters of artwork are catalogued in the flat files also located in the seminar room. Please sign out all materials.
  • Secure storage for your students.
  • Clean-up all materials; returning them to the proper location. Consider having your students assist you in clean-up. Sweep and mop floor at the end of the day.
  • Arrive early.
  • Attend service learning meetings.
  • Fully attend to the first meeting; your first meeting is an important one. This meeting obviously sets the tone for this experience. Consider and plan for this extended time together. Consider:

– How will you introduce yourself? How will you get to know your students?

+ Share images of the artwork of your favorite artist(s)?hsww

+ Share your art?

+ Ask what types of art students are interested in? …Hobbies?

+ What types of art making has he or she created?

– Introduce the idea of using a sketchbook for planning, ideation, and art making. Share your sketchbooks.

Draw in your sketchbooks together.

-Suggest activities that are “curious” for your students and  personally relevant.

 

Understanding the plan…

Planning for your meetings is important. Remember that your plan is a guide. You should always let the student guide the direction of your exploration. Please refer to the lesson plan page https://csuart325.com/lesson-plan-format/ to download the plan form and other support materials to aid in your teaching.

Stage 1 – Desired Results

  • Relevance – What are you going to teach and why is this lesson of importance to your students? How is it relevant to students of this age and background?
  • Essential Understanding(s) – What are the “big ideas”? What specific understandings about them are desired? What misunderstandings are predictable? (Reflect and Transfer)
  • Essential Question(s) – What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning? (Reflect and Transfer)
  • Outcomes (objectives): What will students know and be able to do? What key knowledge and skills will students acquire as a result of this unit? …Art history and culture; expressive features and characteristics of art; art materials, tools, and techniques? What should they eventually be able to do as a result of such knowledge and skill? …Compare and contrast art work; analyze sketches? (Comprehend and Create)

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence

  • Student Reflective Activity: Through what authentic performance task(s) will students demonstrate the desired understandings? How will students reflect upon and self-assess their learning? (Comprehend, Reflect, Create, Transfer.
  • Teacher-centered Assessment (instrument): By what criteria will “performances of understanding” be judged? What evidence (e.g. quizzes, tests, academic prompts, observations, products/artwork, sketchbooks, journals, etc.) will students demonstrate achievement of the desired results?

Stage 3 – Learning Plan (Where to…”)

  • W = help the students know where the unit/lesson is going and what is expected? Help the teacher know where the students are coming from (prior knowledge, interests)? Comprehend
  • H = hook all students and hold their interest? Reflect and Create
  • E = equip students, help them experience the key ideas, and explore the issues to generate ideas for their artwork? Create
  • R = provide opportunities to rethink and revise their understandings and work? Reflect and Transfer
  • E = allow students to evaluate their work and its implications? Reflect
  • T = be tailored (personalized) to the different needs, interests, abilities of learners
  • O = be organized to maximize initial and sustained engagement as well as effective learning?

Planning Components

Visual Art Lesson Plan                   Lesson Title:                         Group:

Lesson Idea and Relevance: What are you going to teach and why is this lesson of importance to your students? How is it relevant to students of this age and background?

Essential Understanding (s): What are the “big ideas”? What specific understandings about them are desired?

Essential Question (s): What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer of learning?

Outcomes – Students will know…What key knowledge and skills will students acquire as a result of this unit? …Art history and culture; expressive features img_2543and characteristics of art; art materials, tools, and techniques? What should they eventually be able to do as a result of such knowledge and skill?  …Compare and contrast art work; analyze sketches? Students will be able to:

Student Reflective Activity: Through what authentic performance task(s) will students demonstrate the desired understandings? How will students reflect upon and self-assess their learning?

Assessment Instrument (s): By what criteria will “performances of understanding” be judged?

Pre-assessment: How will you help the students know where the unit is going and what is expected? Help the teacher know where the students are coming from (prior knowledge, interests)?

Motivation: How will you hook all students and hold their interest?

Ideation: How will you equip students, help them experience the key ideas, and explore the issues to generate ideas for their art work?

Procedures: How is lesson organized to maximize initial and sustained engagement as well as effective learning? Provide opportunities to rethink and revise their understandings and work? Allow students to evaluate their work and its implications? Include literacy and numeracy?

Materials, Resources, Safety: What is needed to complete the learning plan?

Accommodations/Differentiation: How is the lesson tailored (personalized) to the different needs, interests, and abilities of learners? …Access (Resources and/or Process) and Expression (Products and/or Performance)?

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